Archive for the ‘Fencing’ Category

Local fencers qualify for nationals

March 10, 2010

From our friend Gerhard Guevarra…

FAYETTEVILLE – Although the All-American Fencing Academy didn’t bring home any medals during the North Carolina State Championships, Fayetteville’s fencers did well enough to secure two spots for July’s U.S. Fencing National Championships in Atlanta.

The state championships occurred at the Carmichael Gym at N.C. State in Raleigh.  Over 100 fencers competed last weekend in a tournament to qualify for National Championships.  Fayetteville sent 7 fencers to the state championships.

The tournament also took a moment of silence to recognize one of Raleigh Fencer’s family members who was recently killed in action in Afghanistan.

Gerhard Guevarra and John Page qualified for Division II and Veterans Championships, respectively.

Also competing at his first state championship, Brennan Mullane, who’s father is currently stationed on Fort Bragg, had an outstanding performance in the age 16 and under event and the age 14 and under event.

“Brennen is 13, he was one of the youngest in the under 16 event, so it was a much tougher tournament for him.  However, in the under 14 event, Brennan did very well.  With more training and more competition experience, he could easily place in the top 4 next year,” states head coach Guevarra.

This year, Brennen placed seventh in the under 14 event.  He took 2 wins in his preliminary pools and swept his first direct elimination, winning 15-2, before losing in the second round of eliminations against the first seed, Hampton Kennedy, who would eventually take second place.

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All-American Fencing Academy open house

January 12, 2010

From our friend Gerhard Guevarra…

FAYETTEVILLE – On Friday, Jan. 22, the All-American Fencing Academy will be hosting an Open House and offering FREE Sabre Fencing Classes for ages 7 and up.

The Olympic sport of fencing is growing in the United States and a number of fencing schools have opened and have fencers competing Nationally in North Carolina. Several fencers are continuing to fence in Division I collegiate programs including Fayetteville’s All-American Fencing Academy.

One of the more popular weapons in fencing, sabre, has taken hold of many fencers and the All-American Fencing Academy has brought in a new coach to provide classes for new fencers and students interested in trying a new sport.

During Downtown Fayetteville’s Fourth Friday, the All-American Fencing Academy will host an Open House for all those interested in learning more about the sport. The Fencing Academy will also be providing FREE classes!

The FREE class schedules are as follows, pre-registration is NOT required:

5-6 PM: Free Women’s and Girls Only Sabre Workshop
6-7 PM: Ages 7-11 Free Beginning Fencing/Sabre Workshop
7-8 PM: Ages 12-18 Free Beginning Fencing/Sabre Workshop
8-9 PM: Ages 19+ Free Beginning Fencing/Sabre Workshop

It’s a New Year! Why not try a new sport, meet new friends and get fit all at the same time?

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldson St. It instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup and NCAA fencers.

The All-American Fencing Academy offers programs in Downtown Fayetteville, as well as after school programs at Fayetteville Academy, Village Christian Academy and Flaming Sword Academy, and through Fort Bragg’s SKIESUnlimited program.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 910-644-0137 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

Winter Fencing Camp

December 14, 2009

From our friend Gerhard Guevarra…

The All-American Fencing Academy is hosting a Winter Advanced Fencing Skills and Competition Preparation Camp for all new and beginner fencers from December 28-31, 2009.

Fencers will strengthen basic fencing skills and learn advanced techniques as well as competition preparation. Fencers will be able to participate in a tournament at the end of camp.

Schedule

Ages 7-11: Mon-Thur: 8-11 a.m.
Ages 12-18: Mon-Thur: 12-3 p.m.
Registration Fees: $75 per student
Registration deadline extended to Dec. 23
Registration can be done with All-American Fencing Academy and is also available through Fort Bragg SKIESUnlimited.

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldson St. It instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult.

Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup and NCAA fencers.

The All-American Fencing Academy is also offering several summer camps in June. For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 910-644-0137 or visit www.allamericanfencing.com.

Harry Rulnick Memorial Tournament results

November 3, 2009

Paul Hovey

From our friend Gerhard Guevarra… 

On a chilly, late-October morning, North Carolina’s most talented fencers met once again for the Fifth Annual Harry Rulnick Memorial at the All-American Fencing Academy in Downtown Fayetteville.

They Annual Harry Rulnick Tournament is a tribute to Fayetteville native, Harry Rulnick, an early supporter of the All-American Fencing Academy. He also fenced at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1939-1943, where he also became the South Atlantic Champion.

This year, the tournament was renamed the Harry Rulnick Memorial to honor Mr. Rulnick’s passing in March of 2009.

Fencers from Charlotte, Raleigh, Wilmington, New Bern, Chapel Hill and Fayetteville were represented in this year’s tournament. Returning competitors included two-time Rulnick champion, Tommy Dietz of the Charlotte Fencing Academy.

The Harry Rulnick Memorial also saw the return of All-American Fencer, Paul Hovey, who now fences for North Carolina’s varsity fencing program.

Paul Hovey, now under the tutelage of Dr. Ron Miller, fenced confidently and strongly. Paul’s touches all seemed planned as his point found target after target. Balanced and poised, he effortlessly three fencers, while only dropping two bouts in his first pool.

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All-American Academy Fencer to fence with Carolina

June 9, 2009

Gerhard Guevarra and Paul Hovey

Gerhard Guevarra sent in this excellent piece on one of his students, Paul Hovey, who is heading off to fence at North Carolina…

On Friday, June 5, Fayetteville’s fencing coach watched a high school senior who has not only been his student, but one of his closest friends and trustworthy assistant coaches walk across the stage at Weaver Auditorium at Methodist University and graduate as salutatorian from Reid Ross Classical High School.

He will also become the All-American Fencing Academy’s first fencer to fence on a Division I NCAA team.

Eight years ago, Gerhard Guevarra returned to Fayetteville as the director of Pine Forest Recreation Center and started the Cumberland County Fencing Club. A few months later, a young student named Paul Hovey decided to begin a new an unknown hobby and sport.

At 9 years old and in fourth grade, Paul Hovey was one of Guevarra’s first and youngest students. Hovey started to learn foil as all of Guevarra’s students did, but quickly decided to learn and fence epee, Guevarra’s least strongest weapon to coach.

“If I had to think back eight years ago, all I can recall was a young boy who enjoyed learning to fence and always seemed to have fun with it,” Guevarra said.

Hovey stayed with it for eight years, continuing to fence with Guevarra as the fencing club progressed from the Cumberland County Fencing Club at Pine Forest Recreation Center, to the All-American Fencing Club at Albritton Junior High School on Fort Bragg, to its final location and moniker…the All-American Fencing Academy in Downtown Fayetteville.

Before Guevarra knew it, Paul was in high school and not only fencing, but taking an active role in coaching younger students and managing the club. He had progressed so much as a fencer the coach could no longer consistently defeat him in fencing bouts.

“He had been with me for so long, Paul not only knew how I ran the school, but knew what directions it should go. I couldn’t have asked for a better business partner and fencer.”

Hovey essentially helped build the club from its small beginnings to one of North Carolina’s strongest schools of fencing. He will now not only attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, but become Gerhard’s first student to fence Division I NCAA fencing.

“He will be joining my alma mater and be fencing under the same coach and guidance I fenced under,” Guevarra said. “It feels like everything has come full circle.”

Paul’s departure to college and from the All-American Fencing Academy falls at a time when the Academy takes an even broader leap forward as it hires a new beginner’s foil and sabre coach to augment its current program.

Reminiscing the Past

On a Saturday evening as Guevarra and Hovey were doing maintenance to the fencing school, they could be overheard like two veterans talking about where the program came from.

You can hear mentions of equipment being improvised. Great students. Interesting students. Students that made them laugh. Competitions. Practical jokes. Old coaches. Moves to new facilities. And dreams that have come true.

“I guess eight years had to come to an end sometime,” Hovey said.

Guevarra took a moment to sit down with Paul to find out what exactly those eight years were like, starting with a question to which he knew the answer all too well, but asked anyway…why Hovey started fencing what attracted him to it.

“Every kid sees sword fighting in movies,” Hovey said. “I mean, who hasn’t run around with sticks pretending to be pirates or Jedi. When I learned there was an actual sport for sword fighting, I immediately wanted to try it.”

Little did he know that it was more than just sword fighting. The discipline in fencing was akin to that of any sport. Before he knew, it he was fully engrossed in the sport and was beginning to build a name for himself in North Carolina.

“The years just kind of flew by,” Hovey said. “First I was just hanging out with friends, then I actually wanted to fence, then came the realization that I could and wanted to do this in college.”

He progressed from a beginner fencer, competing at North Carolina local tournaments, to regional competitions, then to National tournaments.

“My first tournament was miserable,” Hovey said. “It was a team tournament and I was paired with two college students. One girl had the flu and one had been fencing for one month. I didn’t score a single touch the whole day.”

My first National tournament was mind blowing. All my tournaments before included about 15-25 fencers, suddenly I was up against 150 fencers. It was scary but exhilarating; it was the most fun I’ve ever had in fencing.”

“I’ve had hundreds of bouts, but a few stand out,” he continued. “Notably, a bout I had with Barry Gobble from our rival club at Raleigh. It was at Fayetteville’s second annual Harry Rulnick Open. Barry was a tall left-handed fencer and I was the complete opposite. We tied the score at match point and we both made a mistake of thinking we both scored. We both paused and looked away for a brief second before realizing no touches were awarded and we charged at each other again. I lost 14-15.”

Hovey also noted when he finally felt like he pushed his fencing level up another level. At a tournament in Durham, he remembers a “defining point.” He was considerably down in a direct elimination round and remembers everything becoming very clear and being very calm about earning every single touch.

“That’s when I began winning and felt like I was actually an experienced fencer,” he said.

However, his time with the All-American Fencing Academy hasn’t always been just a fencer. He eventually began assistant coaching the team and working as an assistant manager at the fencing academy.

“Gerhard (I’m probably the only one there that calls him Gerhard) was my first boss and my favorite,” he said. “I feel like he’s been a father to me and watching me grow into an athlete. As a coach, he has always been open to my suggestions and I feel we have given the All-American Fencing Academy an incredible personality.”

Being part of the team has been a large part of his fencing career, but he has also been an assistant coach for part of the time.

“Aaron Keefe and Esteban Muniz were my best friends,” he said. “Training, fencing and travelling together made it better. Looking back at students I’ve worked with, Stephanie Mahaney has been my favorite. Stephanie was a foil fencer, so we didn’t interact much, but when she started working with epee I began a mentor for her. Working with Stephanie has been one of the most rewarding parts of my job.”

Leaving the All-American Fencing Academy to fence with a new team, coach, and facility feels daunting. I’ve been with Gerhard for eight years and together we built the All-American Fencing Academy. I can tell you every fencer we’ve had.”

“Now I’ll be training under Gerhard’s old coach, Dr. Ron C. Miller, with a team of new fencers,” he continued. “It feels like I’m new to fencing again, it’s scary, but I can’t wait to start. I am looking forward to the intensive training I’m going to get. Long drills, sore muscles, and painful lessons. There is something sadistically rewarding about working hard like that.”

There are constantly new fencers joining the All-American Fencing Academy every month. Hovey was able to give some advice to people who have never fenced and for the new fencers, young and old.

“Fencing is great for you and rewarding,” he said. “It’s one of the most fun sports out there. No matter how difficult it is in the beginning and how many losses you take, don’t give up. Everyone hits this wall where they just feel like no matter what they do or how hard they try, it’s useless but if you can get past that wall…then you know what fencing is all about.”

About the All-American Fencing Academy

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldson St. It instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup and NCAA fencers.

The All-American Fencing Academy is also offering several summer camps in June.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 728-4924 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

All-American Fencing Academy to host clinic

March 13, 2009

This came in from our friend Gerhard Guevarra…

On Tuesday, March 31, from 6-7 p.m., two of Fayetteville’s top high school fencers will be hosting a free fencing clinic for all high school students at the All-American Fencing Academy.

The fencing clinic is free to all participants and will cover a history on the sport of fencing, training, competition, basic footwork and blade work. There will be hands-on participation for all participants.

Paul Hovey states, “Fencing is a sport that’s just as demanding as any other sport. It’s great for people who really like individual competition rather than team sports.”

Hovey, a senior at Reid Ross Classical High School, and Brianna Osinski, a junior at Terry Sanford, recently competed in the 2009 North American Cup in Atlanta, Ga. Hovey placed in the top 32 out of nearly 100 fencers. Brianna also did well in her first North American Cup, but was eliminated in the second round.

Hovey has also been accepted to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he will be fencing for the Tar Heels.

Details

What: Free Fencing Clinic for High School Students

Where: All-American Fencing Academy, 207 B Donaldson St., Fayetteville, NC 28301

When: Tuesday, March 31, 6-7 p.m.

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldson St. The All-American Fencing Academy instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup, NCAA and Foreign National Team fencers.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 728-4924 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

All-American Fencing Academy update

February 20, 2009

Gerhard Guevarra

We got this note in from our friend Gerhard Guevarra at the All-American Fencing Academy… 

Fayetteville Fencers Ready for the North American Cup

With one week left, Fayetteville’s top fencers squeeze in as much training and practice as they can before leaving for fencing’s North American Cup in Atlanta.

A record eight fencers from Fayetteville’s All-American Fencing Academy will be competing in seven different events.

For the first time, Fayetteville will be also fielding fencers in Veteran’s and Women’s events.

John Page will be fencing in the Veteran’s and Division III Men’s Foil. While Stephanie Mahaney and Brianna Osinski lead the way for Fayetteville in the Division III Women’s Foil.

Veteran North American Cup fencers Paul Hovey, Derek Secord and Gerhard Guevarra are looking for a good finish in their respective events.

Hovey is one of All-American Fencing Academy’s seasoned fencers is confident for a top 32 placement, placing higher than his previous finish.

Guevarra has a tougher road ahead of him. He, too, is looking for a higher placement after finishing 12th, 8th and 4th in his previous North American Cups.

“It’s going to feel like everyone is out to get me,” he said. “I completely expect to win this tournament, but it definitely won’t be easy.”

Guevarra was North Carolina’s state champion in 2008.

Fayetteville Fencers Earn Medal at Airborne Open

In one last push for a confidence builder and skills test, Fayetteville’s fencers were put to one more challenge at the Airborne Open recently, where Page pulled away a third place finish against a dominating Raleigh contingency.

Fencers from Wilmington, Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro and Fayetteville met for the competition at the All-American Fencing Academy.

Page was the All-American Fencing Academy’s “sleeper.” John Page had just recently gotten back into fencing after almost 30 years. His last active competitive season was during his years at New York University with then teammate and 1984 Olympic bronze medalist, Peter Westbrook.

He could easily be underestimated. This grey fox in fencing is short, his equipment looks dated, but his moves are sharp, precise and his point control is unmistakably accurate. As his opponents discovered in his pools, if they were unable to stop his attack, his point always found its target.

Page easily rolled through his opponents, but would take one loss to Raleigh’s Stephen Pashby in a close bout ending in a score of 5-4.

“We had a great turnout of fencers. Our last two tournaments gave Fayetteville an excellent opportunity to see how we will fair in Atlanta.” Guevarra, who is also the team’s head coach, said.

The top eight finishers won “swag bags.” According to Guevarra, the All-American Fencing Academy’s has become famous for their swag bags for the top finishers. Fencers all over the east coast have come to expect them.

“The term was originally coined by one of the winners and posted a picture of the prize on her blog and labeled it ‘swag bag’. So the name stuck,” Guevarra said.

The swag bags all included prizes from tournament sponsors including Moore Exposure, the Airborne Special Operations Museum and Army Recruiting.

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldspn St. The All-American Fencing Academy instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup, NCAA and Foreign National Team fencers.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 728-4924 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

Fencers bring home medals

February 3, 2009

From our good friends at the All-American Fencing Academy…

Fayetteville’s two powerhouse epee fencers, Paul Hovey and Esteban Muniz, took second and third, respectively, in the open epee event. Second seed Paul and third seed Esteban faced each other in the semi-finals to qualify for the final bout against Raleigh Fencing Club’s Justin Jacobs.

“Against Esteban, we’ve been fencing each other for a few years, so I knew exactly how he would react to my plays, and I capitalized on it,” Hovey said.

Paul walked away into the finals with a 15-10 win over Esteban to face the number one seed from Raleigh.

Paul took an early but small lead, but Justin was able to tie up the score around the ninth touch, and then took the lead. Paul was able to close the gap, but wasn’t able to create enough single score touches to pull ahead again.

“Paul had an excellent bout with Justin Jacobs. In my opinion, Justin didn’t know what to do with Paul except to go faster, harder and stronger. Paul didn’t adjust and play his own game,” says Gerhard Guevarra, head coach of the All-American Fencing Academy.

Raleigh’s Justin Jacobs went on to take first place in a 15-11 bout against All-American Fencing Academy’s Paul Hovey.

Both Paul and Esteban are veteran North American Cup competitors. In the last North American Cup, Paul placed 62nd and Esteban placed 31st.

In the youth foil tournament, Greensboro’s Mario Castro simply had control over the other fencers. Mario was athletic, confident and was able to score consistently.

Gerhard stated, “He had a solid grasp of fencing fundamentals, he had great execution, and he definitely knew that he can win his bouts.”

All-American’s Brianna Osinski took second place and Inez Page took third place in the open foil.

Al-American Fencing’s fencers will compete in Fayetteville one more time prior to the Atlanta North American Cup. The All-American Fencing Academy will host the Airborne Open, a United States Fencing Association sanctioned event, on Sunday, Feb. 8, in Downtown Fayetteville.

Fencers from all over North Carolina are expected to attend.

Everyone is invited to watch North Carolina’s top fencers in action. There is no admission cost. Assistant coaches will also be available to talk to spectators and anyone that is interested will have an opportunity to learn about the growing sport of fencing.

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207 B Donaldson St. The All-American Fencing Academy instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and nationally. Their coaches include former World Cup, NCAA and Foreign National Team fencers.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 728-4924 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

Take a tilt at fencing

January 29, 2009

Yes, I know, another really bad pun…

This came in from our good friends at the All-American Fencing Academy:

Two Opportunities to See Fayetteville’s Fencers Compete

Fayetteville and the surrounding community will have two opportunities to watch Fayetteville’s All-American Fencing Academy’s fencers in action. The All-American Fencing Academy is hosting two local tournaments in their facility in Downtown Fayetteville over the next two weekends.

On Saturday, Jan. 31, the All-American Fencing Academy is hosting an intramural tournament between fencing clubs. Fencers from Fayetteville, Durham, Greensboro, Raleigh and even Savannah, Ga., are expected to attend. Events start at 9 a.m. for adults, which includes a mixed epee tournament. After midday, events start for the youth which include foil events for children as young as seven.

On Sunday, Feb. 8, the All-American Fencing Academy will host a United States Fencing Association sanctioned tournament called the “Airborne Open.” The Airborne Open will be an open foil tournament. Many fencers from the North Carolina Division will be attending. Fencers from the UNC-Chapel Hill varsity team are also expected to attend.

Everyone is invited to watch North Carolina’s top fencers in action. There is no cost for admission. Assistant coaches will also be available to talk to spectators and anyone that is interested will have an opportunity to learn about the growing sport of fencing.

ABOUT THE ALL-AMERICAN FENCING ACADEMY

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville at 207-B Donalds St. It instructs and trains recreational and competitive fencers from ages 7 to Adult. Its fencers compete regionally and natnionally. Their coaches include former World Cup, NCAA and Foreign National Team fencers.

For more information about the All-American Fencing Academy, please call 728-4924 or visit http://www.allamericanfencing.com.

Youthful fencers fare well

December 10, 2008

This came from our good friend Gerhard Guevarra. For more on the All-American Fencing Academy, drop him a line at info@allamericanfencing.com. 

Three of the All-American Fencing Academy’s youngest fencers recently competed in their first tournament and they’re eager to show the rest of North Carolina that they’re ready.

Jesus Sierra, 7, Gabe Ignacio, 8, and Jake Thompson, 9, are by far the youngest competitors that the All-American Fencing Academy has fielded. They’ve all shown that they have the passion, athleticism and maturity for a high level of fencing.

Gabe Ignacio, who took third place in his first competition, looked excited going into his first competition and left weary after giving it his all.

“Gabe is a pretty decent offensive fencer and he’s slowly building confidence in his attacks. He has a great long attack, but forgets he can reach that far,” states head coach Gerhard Guevarra.

Jesus Sierra Jr., whose father is one of All-American Fencing Academy’s assistant coaches, is also showing great enthusiasm for the sport and took second place in his first tournament. Jesus Sr. was a former Cuban National Fencing Team member and Jesus Jr. is quickly emulating his father.

“Jesus Jr., as opposed to Gabe, has got a great defense and a developing offense. It’s been difficult for Jesus’ teammates to get through his blade and land an attack,” Guevarra said.

Jake Thompson took first place in his first competition, and looks to be one of the strongest youth fencers. Jake’s fencing is very systematic and you can clearly see problem solving skills to create attacks and touches that he wants.

“He doesn’t appear to be aggressive, but he’s clean, calm and he knows how to score,” said Guevarra. “I love to watch him fence because he uses everything he’s been taught, finds weaknesses and is consistent when he finds a way to score.”

Gabe, Jesus and Jake are only three members of All-American Fencing Academy’s team of youth fencers. You can find them on Tuesday nights consistently working hard, learning from their coaches and from each other.

For a full hour, you can find these young kids, boys and girls, in a sport they love and enjoy. One of the games they play at the school is a fencing version of king of the hill. Gabe, Jesus and Jake have been the kids to beat. The other youth fencers are excited and are eager to take their spot.

The All-American Fencing Academy currently has openings in their beginner classes and takes fencers as young as seven years old.

All-American Fencers Compete in a Team Event

All-American fencers join together to fence for the first time to participate in a rare team event against other fencers in North Carolina. Although Durham’s Mid-South Fencing Club took the gold, Fayetteville’s fencers demonstrate that as a team, they are formidable and ready for any challenge.

The Mid-South Fencing team had experience, both in practice and competitively. They’ve been fencing individually and practice as a team for years, it was a difficult road for any team to travel on.

However, the two All-American Fencing Academy teams hung on to keep the scores relatively close. Veteran fencers Dale Dingle and Francis Cicchini were able to either hold of a rampant lead or close the gap while newer competitors like Brianna Osinski and Stephanie Mahaney used the opportunity to strengthen their competitive skills.

“Brianna and Stephanie are two of our hardest working fencers. They love the sport and they love to learn, they’re trying to soak in everything they’ve been taught and fencing very smartly,” Guevarra said.

Brianna and Stephanie are two of All-American Fencing Academy’s growing number of female fencers, and right now they’re two of All-American’s top female competitors.

The fencers now are getting ready for the North American Cup at Atlanta in February. The North American Cup fields over 150 fencers each year in each of its events and the All-American Fencing Academy will be sending a good group of fencers this year.

“I’m positive that one or two of us will make it in the top 8 in their events. Assistant coaches Paul Hovey, John Page and Jesus Sierra are all expected to compete and place well,” Guevarra said.

Also planning to participate in Atlanta are Dingle, Osinski, Cicchini, and Julianne Young.

Young is one of our newest competitors, currently coached by Hovey. Fencing is her senior project.

About the All-American Fencing Academy

The All-American Fencing Academy is located in Downtown Fayetteville. Its coaching staff includes former NCAA fencers, national team fencers and World Cup fencers. The All-American Fencing Academy provides training and instruction for recreational and competitive fencing for students ages 7 and up; beginner classes start every month. Group lessons and private lessons are also available for all three weapons (foil, epee and sabre).